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Livia’s Villa Reloaded

CNR Institute for Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage with Arcus S.p.A. support, the Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Rome, National Roman Museum – Baths of Diocletian, V-MusT.net.

CNR curator: Eva Pietroni (CNR-ITABC).

Application design, Software Development, Graphics Optimizations, Light Design, Terrain & Garden Design, Green-Screen Video footage.

Livia’s Villa reloaded is an update of the original Virtual Museum of the Ancient Via Flaminia, a large multidisciplinary project produced in 2006-2008 by the Institute for Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage (ITABC) CNR with Arcus S.p.A. support. Its main outcome was the creation of a virtual reality multi-user application to communicate the archaeological landscape of the ancient Via Flaminia. The application was installed in the headquarters of the National Roman Museum -Baths of Diocletian.

After more than three years of running, in 2013 CNR ITABC, in collaboration with the Superintendence for Archaeological Heritage of Rome, E.V.O.CA. and the european network V-Must, has created a new version of the project, reusing and improving the initial data and focusing on the Livia’s Villa location, one of the most significant sites among those that were investigated and documented in the first place. The new virtual reality installation introduces elements of great innovation. For instance, the interaction paradigm that uses natural interfaces based on body gestures and new forms of media integration, combining both virtual reality and cinematographic language.

The application, selected to be part of the exhibition “Italy of the Future” on the excellence of Italian research in various disciplines organized by the MFA and the CNR, is permanently hosted by the National Roman Museum – Baths of Diocletian.